Vetiver

Vetiver

Chrysopogon zizanioides, commonly known as Vetiver (derived from Tamil word: வெட்டிவேர் vettiver) is a perennial grass of the Poaceae family. Vetiver can grow up to 1.5 metres high and form clumps as wide. The stems are tall and the leaves are long, thin, and rather rigid; the flowers are brownish-purple. Unlike most grasses, which form horizontally spreading, mat-like root systems, Vetiver’s roots grow downward, 2–4 m in depth. The most commonly used commercial genotypes of Vetiver are sterile (do not produce fertile seeds), and because vetiver propagates itself by small offsets instead of underground stolons, these genotypes are non-invasive and can easily be controlled by cultivation of the soil at the boundary of the hedge. Vetiver grass is used extensively for erosion and sediment control in a wide variety of applications. the Vetiver system, a technology of soil conservation and water quality management, is based on the use of the Vetiver plant.